A Look Back at Typhoon Phanfone

It’s been more than a day since Typhoon Phanfone passed through the Tokyo area, and I’ve been able to see the effects around my home.  Thankfully, there was no damage.  The wind wasn’t so bad, but the rain was incredibly heavy.  South of where I live, there were evacuation orders for those living around the Hikiji and Sakai rivers in Fujisawa.  I live about a 10 minute walk from Hikiji River, but my area wasn’t included in the evacuation orders.  However, when I went out to go to work, I saw the water level in the rivers around my home.  Unbelievable.

I’d like you to check out all of the posts I made during the typhoon.  I was live-blogging the entire time.  So, have a look.

October 5th (morning) – My original post.

October 5th (early afternoon) – Rain and wind were increasing, but nothing major yet.

October 5th (early evening) – On my way home.  It still wasn’t so bad, but I was getting wet.

October 6th (after midnight) – My last post before going to bed.

October 6th (8:42 am) – Holy crap, that’s heavy rain. The typhoon has arrived.

October 6th (after 9am) – Very heavy rain.  That’s a downpour.

October 6th (10:37 am) – We’d heard the evacuation order for Fujisawa at this time.  50 mm/h rain!

October 6th (around 11:30 am) – The rain had stopped suddenly and it became sunny quickly.  But look at these photos of the rivers.  They were incredibly high.

October 7th – A few thoughts about the typhoon.

So, today (or I should say yesterday, as it’s past midnight now), I went down to the Hikiji River to see the aftermath of the typhoon.  The water level had risen about 2 metres, which is pretty impressive for a river that is only about 50 cm deep.  So, please watch this video.

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Live-blogging Typhoon Phanfone

I’ve been live-blogging typhoon Phanfone on my book blog for a little bit of fun.  I’ve made several posts so far, but the typhoon hasn’t arrived yet.  However, it’s been very rainy and windy all day.  Tomorrow morning, the rain and wind will be very strong.  Winds of around 100 km/h are expected in Yokohama.  I work there tomorrow.  I wonder how I’m getting to work.

Check out the live blogs so far.

The morning of October 5th.

The afternoon of October 5th.

The evening of October 5th.

Late night/very early morning October 6th.

There should be three more posts coming tomorrow.  One in the morning, one around noon, and one during my break at work.

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Deadly Eruption at Mount Ontake

Jay Dee:

Mt. Ontake erupted on Saturday. Here’s what I had to write about it.

Originally posted on I Read Encyclopedias for Fun:

Mt. Ontake.  Looks beautiful, doesn't it?

Mt. Ontake. Looks beautiful, doesn’t it?

Such a tranquil-looking mountain isn’t it?  Well, Mt. Ontake is Japan’s second tallest volcano, and it erupted on Saturday.  There were around 300 people on the mountain at the time, and 31 are suspected to be dead, as there were many at the summit around the caldera during the eruption.

I live around 190 km from the mountain (Tokyo is 200 km from it), which is on the border of Nagano and Gifu prefectures.  At 3,067 metres tall, it’s a fairly tall stratovolcano with a somewhat frequent history of eruptions.  It’s interesting that it’s often climbed considering how often it does erupt.

Another volcano, at 3,776 metres, is Mt. Fuji.  It’s visible from my area, and is the tallest mountain in Japan.  It occasionally has earthquakes around it, and in recent years, the lakes around it have been getting a bit warmer.  There…

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A Morning at the Embassy

Jay Dee:

On Friday, I visited the Canadian Embassy in Tokyo. I blogged about this on my other blog, as this has more to do with Canada than Japan. Please check it out.

Originally posted on I Read Encyclopedias for Fun:

On Friday the 19th, I went to the Canadian Embassy with my daughter.  The Embassy is in Akasaka in Tokyo, which is an area that has many embassies, shopping areas, and is just plain rich-looking.  The Canadian Embassy is across the street from the Crown Prince’s residence.  You can’t see the house from the Embassy, just trees.  It’s surrounded by a wall with cameras and police officers patrolling the perimeter.

I posted these pictures last night, hoping you could guess what they were.

The front of the Canadian Embassy.

The front of the Canadian Embassy.

The west side of the Embassy.

The west side of the Embassy.

The southwest corner of the Embassy.

The southwest corner of the Embassy.

It’s a pretty modern building and quite massive for an embassy.  There are other buildings on the embassy lands, including one that looks like it’s a hall for events.  In the main building, the first floor is a library, but to get inside, you have to take an escalator…

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It Can’t Be Halloween Yet, Can it?

It’s early September, and what do I see?  Halloween decorations.  Sounds like some businesses are very enthusiastic about Halloween to be decorating this early.  Not even out of summer yet.  Well, I made this video a couple days ago about how businesses in Japan tend to decorate for Halloween far earlier than they need to.  Keep in mind that the business I show is an opticians and they don’t have a special Halloween sale going on.

Now, this video isn’t just me talking about Halloween decorations.  You’ll want to watch to the end, because I had a rather creepy encounter.

I sure didn’t expect that.

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Filed under Asahi-ku, Festivals & Events, Fujisawa, Japan, Kanagawa, Yokohama

Moving Out? Demolish that House

Anyone who lives in Japan will notice a lot of old houses get demolished.  You never see a for sale sign in front of a house.  Why is that?  Well, the real estate industry is much different in Japan than it is in North America.

In North America, when someone moves out of a house, they sell it.  It’s usually appreciated in value, especially if work has been done on the house to improve it.  Houses are also built to last for decades.  They’re solidly built.  That’s not the case in Japan.  Houses are not built to last.  They’re rather thin-walled, poorly insulated, and many of them these days are prefabricated.  Old houses are usually torn down and replaced with two or three new houses on the same property.  Near my home, there was one property that was divided into seven.  The value of a house is not so much in Japan.  It’s the property that’s valuable.  Moving out? Tear down that house and let the new property owners build their own.  Or are you tired of living in an old house? Tear it down and rebuild in the same location.

I made a video about this as I saw a house in my neighbourhood being torn down.

Whenever I see something like this, I wonder what’s going to be built in its place.

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Filed under Fujisawa, Japan, Kanagawa, Vlog

Driving in Japan

Have you driven in Japan?  I’ve had a Japanese license since I switched my Canadian license for it a few years ago, and when I drive, I rent a car.  Usually, we rent a car to go to Costco.  I made this video and discuss what it’s like to drive in Japan.

So, have you driven in Japan?

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Filed under Daily Life, Fujisawa, Japan, Kanagawa, Vlog